5 Reasons Why the 2200 is the Worst Press We’ve Made

Posted by Amanda Flower on Dec 4, 2018 3:34:08 PM

In eyes of rival press manufacturers, the 2200 is the worst press ever. Yep, we went there. Its reputation of high-quality, maximum versatility and hardware longevity speaks for itself and makes it difficult for converters to allow themselves to part with their pressroom favorite. As you can imagine, this press’ status has caused us some headaches as we continue to improve upon and grow our business.

2200_glamour_72dpiMark Andy 2200

Why exactly is the 2200 known as the Mark Andy pain in the neck around the halls at MA headquarters?

It has workaholic tendencies

The Mark Andy 2200 is notorious for working at least two shifts a day without complaint. Running at 500 fpm, it makes other presses in its class look like slackers. Luckily for other presses, the efficiency and reliability the 2200 converters allows the time to tend to their other OEM machines.

You get what you pay for

That’s how the saying goes, right? When it comes to the 2200, its affordability always raises red flags. How can a press that versatile and that efficient really only cost so little? Potential customers can find it exasperating to get past the fact that such a well-engineered flexo press can have such a low capital cost, but once they realize they’re basically pulling the wool over our eyes and getting a great deal, they’re sold!

It’s a teacher’s pet

Continuing to cast a shadow on other conventional flexo and digital equipment in the pressroom, the 2200 is a press operator favorite due to its ease of operation. Honestly, it makes our customers so happy it’s almost frustrating that they need quite a bit of coaxing to see what’s new on our production lines.

It’s a bit of a know it all

While labels are certainly its specialty, the 2200 doesn’t do well with group projects so it just does a lot of the work itself. From labels and tagging to full variable imaging capabilities and multi-web path applications, this press has definitely earned its notoriety. Additionally, full configurability of print stations on the 2200 allows for specialty finishes not attainable on older press models.

Talk about clingy

The 2200 doesn’t move on easily and will go to great lengths to make sure you never “break up” with it. This press will do everything possible to make sure that you don’t see what’s new in the industry to improve your pressroom operation by living a long, healthy and dependable life. For example, the Mark Andy Performance Series is a clear path to upgrade in terms of growing opportunity and capacity, but it takes quite a bit of coaxing to convince the 2200 owners to check out the other fish in the sea. Once these press owners realize there are other Mark Andy flexo options that work for them, it’s full speed ahead with increased profitability and the possibility of adding wider web widths to production runs.

p7e

Mark Andy Performance Series P7E

In all seriousness, the Mark Andy 2200 is one of the most recognizable presses in the industry, and for good reason; it’s a workhorse label press that is the foundation on which many printers have built their business. With its flexibility, simplicity and high efficiency, this flexo press has stood the test of time and continues to help enforce pressroom profitability.

Thankfully, Mark Andy has the road map in place to help converters not only create a successful business but to maintain it. The Mark Andy Performance Series can elevate your pressroom to the next level. Let us show you how.

Worried about your 2200’s feelings? Don’t - we have a robust trade in program to ensure that your pride and joy will find a new family to join after being restored to good-as-new, OEM specifications condition by our certified Mark Andy technicians.

Contact Us for Trade-In Details

About the Author

Amanda Flower is a Marketing Specialist at Mark Andy's global headquarters located in St. Louis, Missouri. She is an experienced B2B content creator with a penchant for marketing automation, brand management and thinking outside of the box.

Topics: Flexo

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